Archive for June, 2012

June 25, 2012

Tokyo lifestyle and Ikebukuro: fashion, place to reside, and prime location

Tokyo lifestyle and Ikebukuro: fashion, place to reside, and prime location

Sarah Deschamps, Kanako Itamae and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

Tokyo lifestyle is extremely rich and choosing an ideal location to reside depends greatly on the demands of the individual. However, if you like the hustle and bustle of a very powerful area in Tokyo then Ikebukuro is a great choice. Also, the great thing about Ikebukuro is that the price mechanism varies accordingly and in the backstreets you will also find a more tranquil way of life.

The fashion angle of Ikebukuro is extremely powerful and this applies to department stores which include Lumine, Esola, Tobu Department Store, Seibu Department Store, Marui, Parco, and others. This means that Ikebukuro feels extremely young and vibrant in the main shopping areas of East Ikebukuro and West Ikebukuro. The central theme is the huge train station which links so many department stores.

Ikebukuro is blessed with several universities and you also have several other institutions which are nearby. This once more means that this vibrant part of Tokyo is blessed with an enormous pulling power. The same applies to Ikebukuro being the “gateway” which links Saitama with this powerful commercial area in Tokyo. Therefore, many individuals who reside in Saitama will pick Ikebukuro being their first major shopping destination in Tokyo. Similarly, many Tokyoites will also pick Ikebukuro because of the fashion angle and the vibrancy of the nightlife.

West Ikebukuro provides a different angle because it is more cosmopolitan and the abundance of fashion is amazing. This applies to utilizing the adorable Tobu Department Store which caters for amazing fashion brands, crafts, delicious food, and so much more. Also, for expats you have a fine selection of international cheese, wine, beer, and other products to make you feel like “home from home.”

Tobu Department Store also connects with Lumine Department Store in several places and both entities enrich each other. After all, both department stores have unique features and for young ladies who adore fashion then Lumine is one of the most popular department stores in Tokyo. Of course Tobu Department Store provides adorable boutiques for people of both sexes and different age groups. However, the price mechanism and nature of boutiques are different with Tobu Department Store having many exclusive boutiques and being more conservative. Meanwhile the trendy buzz and vibe of Lumine appeals greatly to younger ladies (also caters for male fashion) because this company understands the latest trends. Therefore, Lumine selects powerful shops-in-shop companies to be based in their department stores in order to meet the demands of the younger generation.

Esola is another lovely department store for ladies and Marui is also based in West Ikebukuro. Marui like Lumine is also in high demand for fashion lovers throughout Tokyo because both stores are extremely trendy. Meanwhile Esola provides a lovely elegant feel because despite have many exquisite boutiques, it isn’t too sizeable and this provides a lovely shopping experience. Also, within each department store they cater for other products and you have so many places to eat in the same buildings. This is an added bonus because people can unwind with friends and so forth by relaxing in stylish restaurants where the food is scrumptious.

Tokyo Metropolitan Art Space will re-open this autumn in 2012 and once the new design is on view then people will be able to relax in a stylish arena which caters to the cultural angle of Ikebukuro. Japan Traditional Craft Center in Ikebukuro is also a must place to visit for adorable Japanese crafts. This building is connected to Tobu Department Store and opposite Lumine. The Japan Traditional Craft Center provides a wealth of amazing products and this lovely shopping experience is richly rewarding.

In East Ikebukuro you have Parco Department Store and Seibu Department Store along with a host of other fashion companies in the streets of this side of Ikebukuro. Parco is another vibrant fashion zone for the younger generation meanwhile Seibu Department Store caters for a wealth of diverse products. Also, Seibu Department Store is blessed with stunning boutiques and clearly it is a great place to shop.

Also, on this side of Ikebukuro is Sunshine City which caters for shopping, entertainment, an aquarium, museums, observation deck, and hotel facilities. Sunshine City is an enormous attraction and the streets nearby provide a vibrant atmosphere. This applies to anime stores, entertainment, restaurants, nightlife, independent boutiques, and so much more.

Overall, the lifestyle of Ikebukuro is richly rewarding because this part of Tokyo provides so many options to enjoy. Not only this, the housing areas are relatively quiet and relaxing despite being very close to the buzzing central area. Ikebukuro is also very close to Shinjuku, Ueno, Shibuya, Harajuku, and other major parts of Tokyo. The price mechanism of the housing also means that this part of Tokyo is more affordable than most but of course you can also find places which are extremely expensive. Much depends on your purchasing power. Yet when it comes to being a desirable place to reside in Tokyo then Ikebukuro provides a wealth of options.

 

All photo images taken by Modern Tokyo Times 

www.smackyglam.com  –  Smacky Glam

http://www.esola-ikebukuro.com/ 

http://orizzonti.co.jp/category/actuel/ 

http://www.barbie-stores.com/ 

http://www.bluebellmarket.net/index.html 

http://www.palgroup.co.jp/brands/doudou/ 

http://www.turnojeana.jp/ 

http://www.frees-mart.com/index.html 

http://m-muriel.jp/index.html 

http://www.elleva.jp/ 

http://www.frame-works.co.jp/index_n.html 

http://blog-s.frame-works.co.jp/  Spick and Span official blog

http://www.jolly-boutique.com/ 

http://www.world.co.jp/opaqueclip/ 

http://royalflash-jp.com/pc/home.html 

http://sanyo-i.jp    –  Sanyo i Store (Sanyo Shokai Ltd)

http://www.parco.co.jp/customer/ikebukuro/IkebukuroPARCO_FloorGuide.pdf

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

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June 25, 2012

Kanzashi in Japan being utilized for many fashion styles and occasions

Kanzashi in Japan being utilized for many fashion styles and occasions

Hiroshi Saito, Michel Lebon and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

The Edo era witnessed the real growth and power of kanzashi in Japan despite aspects of the roots being traced back all the way to the Jomon period. Japanese artisans increasingly utilized new innovations throughout the Edo period and this enabled greater sophistication which enhanced the power of kanzashi. Also, the ukiyo-e art movement blossomed throughout the same period and many famous artists highlighted the beauty of Japanese women. Therefore, the visibility of kanzashi was witnessed within many Japanese traditions.

Today in the modern world the concept of kanzashi is equated with beauty, sophistication, stunning artistry, and within traditional dress styles of Japan where hair ornaments enhance the beauty to another level. However, modern day kanzashi is easily available and extremely cheap providing you shop around. Therefore, the degree and sophistication of kanzashi varies enormously and this applies to price mechanisms, quality, dress-style, purpose, and so forth.

Kanzashi is also very flexible when it comes to different age groups and the same applies to utilization. This means that you can witness kanzashi on the streets of Harajuku (Tokyo), Namba (Osaka), Ikebukuro (Tokyo), and throughout trendy fashionable areas in Japan. Alternatively, kanzashi can be witnessed in the most refined areas of Japan where sophistication and tradition remains powerful.

It did appear that kanzashi would be marginalized in Japan once modernization began to flourish. After all, the changing nature of Western hairstyles, dress, music, and other important areas, meant that new approaches to beauty and dress were in full sway throughout the twentieth century in Japan. The earlier root of modernization belongs to the Meiji era but clearly further developments throughout the following century would alter the landscape of Japan.

This meant that kanzashi was becoming marginalized and mainly connected with Japanese high culture and traditions. Therefore, kanzashi became equated with the world of geisha, high culture, traditional weddings, Japanese tea ceremony, and other important aspects of Japanese culture. In a sense, it is true that kanzashi still remains powerful within cultural traditions in Japan but today the development of kanzashi continues to spin in many directions.

After all, kawaii (adorable/cute) culture within the dress style angle does enable kanzashi to flourish because of the natural beauty and concept of this thinking. Of course, kanzashi is not part and parcel of kawaii culture but it is an angle which is utilized by individuals who adore the fashion side of this movement.

Another major development of kanzashi is that today you can find fashion conscious individuals all over the world being fascinated by this Japanese cultural angle. Therefore, the power of the “old world” and high culture in Japan is a huge pulling power internationally. At the same time, the influence of kawaii culture, maid café, animation, and other major themes within Japan are also being transmitted to a greater international audience. Of course, kanzashi isn’t naturally linked to animation but the cultural power of Japanese anime/manga means that younger individuals all over the world are being drawn into learning more about Japanese culture. Also, in some anime you will witness kanzashi and it just highlights how this medium is spreading into new directions.

In an earlier article by Modern Tokyo Times it was stated that “Of course nothing remains static because purest kanzashi is based on gold/silver plated metals, tortoiseshell, lacquered wood and silk – but in the world of accessible fashion and accessories then kanzashi is also being made by using plastics and other materials.”

“Traditional makers of kanzashi remain loyal to the firm foundations of this fashion piece in Japan and international makers also desire to maintain the high culture aspect and rich artistry of kanzashi.”

The power of kanzashi is that it can be utilized to highlight mainstream fashion accessories, high culture, alternative fashion, festivals, and within many areas of traditional Japanese culture. Therefore, kanzashi can be seen in many aspects of modern life while also being powerful within rich Japanese traditions. The same also applies to the price mechanism and quality of individual kanzashi hair ornaments. For this reason, kanzashi continues to thrive and develop within Japan and internationally.

http://www.atelierkanawa.com/#!tsumami-kanzashi

http://www1.odn.ne.jp/maya/english/enknshop.htm

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

June 25, 2012

Japanese art and history: Kano Eitoku and cultural impact of Oda Nobunaga

Japanese art and history: Kano Eitoku and cultural impact of Oda Nobunaga

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

In modern Japan the importance of Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582) and his legacy remains extremely strong even today. After all, he laid the foundation stone for the future centralized Japan despite certain limitations during the Tokugawa period. However, often the more dynamic side of Oda Nobunaga is neglected and instead the focus is on his military prowess and cruelty. Therefore, the linkage of Kano Eitoku with Nobunaga is most illuminating.

Eitoku was one of the most prominent and highly respected artists of the sixteenth century in Japan. He was born in 1543 and died eight years after Nobunaga in 1590. Yet the linkage between the artistic mastery of Eitoku with Nobunaga provides a different angle and one which may have been hidden for political and religious reasons.

Nobunaga was an innovator but sadly his inquisitiveness and openness to international influence would be crushed by following leaders. In time the Tokugawa period (1603-1868) would condemn all converts to Christianity to death and isolate Japan from the world despite some “windows” staying open. The power of Buddhism would be utilized by the state and Confucian order would lead to greater stratification.

This was a far cry from Nobunaga who lifted major economic restrictions on the peasantry, had favorable relations with Christian preachers, modernized the military, and introduced other favorable reforms in the realm of economics. The political intrigues of Buddhist elites who desired to preserve their power concentration were alarmed by Nobunaga. This notably applies to his favorable policies towards the peasants and Christian missionaries. Indeed, Nobunaga is reported to have had little time for stratification and practices which held back progress. He remained to be an atheist but his brother converted to Christianity. Not surprisingly, this alarmed Buddhist elites which feared that their wealth may be challenged by peasant reforms and a competing religion.

If you click on http://www.buddhanet.net/nippon/nippon_partI.html this website the most notable feature is the anti-Christian and anti-Nobunaga bias. It is stated by Buddhanet and Japan Buddhist Foundation that“When Oda Nobunaga overthrew the military government of Ashikaga in 1573, he actively suppressed Buddhist institutions because he feared the increased power of the leading temples and monasteries which sided with his enemies. He favored the newly introduced foreign cult of Christianity for purely political reasons.”

Note that the usage of “foreign cult” could also be stated about Buddhism because this faith wasn’t born in Japan. Also, for the non-religious then all religions could be deemed to be “cults.” However, the most important point is that for hundreds of years you have had massive negative opinions about Nobunaga in certain quarters. Therefore, much of his openness and innovation was hidden by elites who feared the policies of Nobunaga. After all, his fresh thinking alarmed many traditional elites whose only desire was to maintain their power concentration.

In the field of the arts the role of Nobunaga was very important and it is in this area where the connection with Eitoku materializes. This applies to Eitoku being a patron of Nobunaga and other powerful leaders. Even before Nobunaga amassed power and wealth he was always interested in the arts.

Therefore, during the period of Nobunaga a cultural renaissance was also beginning to take shape. This applies to major gardens of stunning beauty being built along with castles which were blessed with rich architectural designs. Indeed, the Azuchi Castle which is located on the shores of the famous Lake Biwa is deemed to be one of the most beautiful castles ever built. Inside, this castle it was adorned with stunning ceiling paintings by Eitoku and other major areas of art related to high quality statues.

Nobunaga also used his innovation in relationship with the Japanese tea ceremony.  Also, the usage of the Japanese tea ceremony during talks about business, trade, and politics were firmly established under Nobunaga and reached a new dimension within the body politic of Japan. Therefore, Sen no Rikyu who was a famous tea master under his rule had an important cultural part to play in developing greater refinement. At the same time Nobunaga was also intrigued by aspects of European culture therefore he collected Western art and studied other areas.

The first Christian church to be built in Kyoto in 1576 was because of Nobunaga’s patronage. While the first steps of modern kabuki began to materialize under his leadership and during the Tokugawa period this important cultural symbol would flourish. Alongside all these innovations Nobunaga had hoped to install a rational political system which moved away from superstition and stratification. This can be seen by his openness to outside ideas and economic policies which enabled trade to flourish, for peasants to have greater freedom and the same applies to artisans. However, his period in power could not fully implement all the reforms that he had desired. Therefore, in time you had a counter-revolution in the realm of ideas which persecuted Christianity, isolated Japan, infringed on the rights of peasants, and whereby traditional power mechanisms once more stifled many areas of life.

In an earlier article about Eitoku and Nobunaga by Modern Tokyo Times it was stated that “Eitoku was born in Kyoto and clearly he belonged to a prestigious family because he was the grandson of Kano Motonobu (1476-1559). Therefore, with the guidance of his grandfather and with being blessed with such talent, which had been recognized when Eitoku was a very young child, he soon came to prominence and patrons like Nobunaga loved the richness of his style.”

“The influence of Chinese painting styles was clear and this was only natural for the day and clearly Motonobu was very proud of his grandson. Eitoku maintained the pre-eminence of the Kano school which was founded by Kano Masanobu (1434-1530?).

Eitoku is a reminder that despite all the carnage during the period of Nobunaga, the cultural realm remained strong and art was highly valued. Therefore, despite the passages of time Eitoku stills remains potent in modern day Japan because he produced many stunning art pieces.”

Eitoku like Nobunaga left a lasting legacy despite the reasons being very different. However, without the patronage of Nobunaga then the amazing skills of Eitoku would have been hindered on a national scale. The relationship between both individuals highlights the sophistication of Nobunaga and the mastery of Eitoku and his stunning pieces of art.

Nobunaga was much more than just a warlord because he helped many aspects of Japanese society to flourish. In the field of culture and art his legacy is extremely rich. Therefore, the artwork of Eitoku provides a glimpse into the world of Nobunaga and his unbelievable free spirit.

http://www.kyohaku.go.jp/eng/tokubetsu/071016/tokubetsu.html  Kyoto National Museum

http://www.all-art.org/asia/japanese_prints/japan_art2.html 

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com 

http://moderntokyotimes.com 

June 15, 2012

Oka Shikanosuke and Henri Rousseau: Art based on grace and tranquility

 Oka Shikanosuke and Henri Rousseau: Art based on grace and tranquility

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

Oka Shikanosuke (1898-1978) took a familiar path for many Japanese artists in this period by moving to France in 1924. The impression of Paris and the French cultural scene must have enchanted Oka Shikanosuke during this period of his life because he stayed until 1939. Artists like Henri Rousseau and Odilon Redon influenced him greatly and the connection between Oka Shikanosuke and Henri Rousseau is visually powerful.

Henri Rousseau (1844-1910) was born in Northern France and from a young age he was fascinated by the arts. If circumstances had been more fortunate then he would have focused more heavily on art and music but his family background was working-class. Therefore, from a financial point of view he faced many restraints. However, his background enabled him to focus on art in a different way because becoming an artist was never going. This applies to the reality of elitism, monetary issues, being outside of powerful circles, and other restraints.

Henri Rousseau therefore was free to teach himself and to follow his own path. This was very liberating despite the hardships and difficulties he faced. Technical wise he also focused on a way that suited his logic and style. Therefore, he would paint from the top of the canvas first and likewise he would paint the colors singularly.

Dieter Wanczura, www.artelino.com, comments about Henri Rousseau that Somehow Henri Rousseau got the attention of some professional avant-garde artists. The discussion whether they took him serious or if he was only some kind of exotic amusement for them fills many books. Toulouse-Lautrec, Edgar Degas, Odilon Redon, Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin and later Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Wassily Kandinsky certainly appreciated his works.”

“It is astonishing and impressive at the same time how this man from the working class and without any academic art training was able to find a style of his own and how he was immune against adopting anything from the avant-garde artists around him. From an outsider who finally got some limited acceptance, you would expect some eager readiness to absorb the styles of the established art world or to experiment with the trendy styles of his avant-garde comrades like impressionism, post-impressionism, fauvism or cubism. Not so for Henri. And this makes him so unique.”

Henri Rousseau overcame many obstacles and more important, he remained true to himself and didn’t suffer from an inferiority complex. This meant that he felt comfortable with the art he produced and understood the power of his own methodology.

This aspect about Henri Rousseau must have intrigued Oka Shikanosuke because in many ways he was a unique artist. Oka Shikanosuke will also have been extremely familiar with Japanese, Chinese, and Western art movements and this will have applied to past history and during his lifetime. It could well be that Oka Shikanosuke was attracted by the uniqueness of Henri Rousseau and that this also created internal freedom for himself.

The path of Oka Shikanosuke was a million miles away from Henri Rousseau when it came to education and learning at famous institutions. During his time in France he met many Japanese artists like Tsuguharu Fujita and many more who were connected to the Ecole de Paris. Also, during his stay in France he taught himself techniques related to oil painting.

Oka Shikanosuke clearly admired Henri Rousseau and other artists like Odilon Redon. Indeed, it is clear that many landscape and still life pieces of art by Oka Shikanosuke were tributes to Henri Rousseau. The love that Oka Shikanosuke felt for his art is witnessed by him introducing Henri Rousseau to a much wider audience in Japan. Suzuki Tsuneshi (1930-2000) also helped greatly because of being the owner of the Pola Orbis Group which built the elegant and vibrant Pola Collection. Therefore, the relationship between Oka Shikanosuke and Suzuki Tsuneshi must be given great credit for highlighting the richness of Henri Rousseau to the Japanese public.

The artist Oka Shikanosuke is a notable artist in his own right and in 1972 he was rewarded for the many areas of his art work, and how he helped so many individuals during his lifetime. Therefore, he received the Order of Cultural Merit which was richly deserved. Many aspects of the art of both Henri Rousseau and Oka Shikanosuke are based on grace and tranquility irrespective of the theme that the art work is based on. They both belong to different generations and culture however through art everything was bridged and this can be seen by the art work of both artists. Oka Shikanosuke took Henri Rousseau to heart despite never meeting in the flesh because of the generation gap.

 

Oka Shikanosuke  – Image 2,4,6, and 8 by Oka Shikanosuke

Henri Rousseau      Image 1,3,5,7, and 9 by Henri Rousseau

 

http://www.polamuseum.or.jp/english/exhibition/03_17.html

http://www.artelino.com/articles/henri_rousseau.asp

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

June 13, 2012

Tokyo and Osaka fashion: Versace intent on expanding after clean slate

Tokyo and Osaka fashion: Versace intent on expanding after clean slate

Michel Lebon, Kanako Itamae and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

Versace re-entered the Japanese market in 2011 after pulling out in 2009 and now this internationally famous company is focused on expansion after positive sales. It remains to be seen if the current situation for Versace is “a true renaissance” in Japan because clearly this company had a difficult time in the years prior to pulling out. However, given the power of this famous brand and with new mechanisms being set up, then clearly the possibility of “a new renaissance” in Tokyo, Osaka, and in other parts of Japan, is feasible given the exquisite nature of this fashion company.

In fairness to Versace, when they closed their stores in Tokyo, Osaka, and Chiba in 2009.  They did make it clear that a return was possible in the near future. This applies to the company statement which stated that it was time to “close them and start with a clean slate.”

Therefore, rather than struggling on and trying to make things work, Versace was focused on “a clean slate.”Given this, it is evident that Versace wanted to refresh their thinking and concepts in order to meet the rigors of the Japanese market. This approach is very intriguing because often companies take negativity by either fluttering away many years or they finally decide to leave a powerful market from weakness. Yet it was clear by the statement in 2009 that Versace left from strength despite the adversity of the time.

In 2011 Versace was true to their word because they did start with “a clean slate” and re-entered the Japanese market. Once more Tokyo and Osaka were the linchpins because both cities are huge and their financial base is enormous. The same applies to both cities having an abundance of fashion districts. Also, the demand for quality brands is more than obvious in both Tokyo and Osaka – and the same applies to other powerful cities, for example Kobe, Nagoya, Sendai, Hiroshima, Yokohama, and other major cities throughout Japan.

However, the Japanese market is extremely competitive and certain unique cultural factors related to business and other areas, means that Versace follows a long list of international companies which found “difficult times” in Japan. Each company will have different reasons behind this and while some have pulled out indefinitely, others have returned once different methodologies have been implemented which suit the host market. Also, some companies that have returned have done so by numbing down their past ambitions but it appears that Versace is intent on expanding after consolidating itself rather quickly.

It is reported that Versace plans to open another three to four stores in Japan before the end of 2012. This is based on positive international sales throughout the world despite the negative global economy. If everything goes according to plan then it will certainly be a “new renaissance” for Versace in Japan and given the innovation of this exquisite company then hopes remain high.

Once Hiroshi Saito was announced to be the Chief Executive Officer of Versace Japan, then the re-entering of Versace into the Japanese market certainly appeared to be the “clean slate” like promised. The Chief Executive Officer of Versace SpA, Gian Giacomo Ferraris, commented in 2011 that “I am very excited to announce that Mr. Saito, whom I worked with very well in the past, is joining our team. He is one of the best managers in the Japanese luxury business and he understands Italian fashion brands better than anyone else.”

“I am confident that, with the arrival of Mr. Saito, our re-entry into the Japanese market will proceed fast and in the correct way. At the Group level, we continue to work with focus and enthusiasm towards our goals which, for 2011, foresee a significant growth in retail and wholesale sales, as well as a return to profitability.”

It would appear that the confidence espoused in the above comments by Gian Giacomo Ferraris is bearing fruit. This can be seen by the expansion plans of Versace after positive sales since re-entering the Japanese market.

 

http://www.versace.com/

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

June 13, 2012

Tokyo tourism: Bridgestone Museum of Art and stunning exhibitions

Tokyo tourism: Bridgestone Museum of Art and stunning exhibitions

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

The Bridgestone Museum of Art (http://www.bridgestone-museum.gr.jp/en/is currently holding an adorable exhibition which will finish on June 24, 2012. This current exhibition is to commemorate the sixtieth year of the creation of this amazing art gallery in the heart of Tokyo. Following the current exhibition titled“Bridgestone Museum of Art at Sixty: You’ve Got to See These Paintings” it will be followed by an intriguing exhibition about “Debussy, Music and the Arts” which will run between July 14 and October 14, 2012. Therefore, all year round you will find extremely fascinating and diverse exhibitions which highlight culture, history, the arts, and so much more related to important elements of human interaction.

This article is about the current exhibition titled the “Bridgestone Museum of Art at Sixty: You’ve Got to See These Paintings.” The exhibition is aimed at highlighting the development of this intriguing museum and special themes have been selected to split the exhibition into eleven fascinating areas.

On the website of the Bridgestone Museum of Art it comments that “Here visitors can enjoy the essence of the Ishibashi Foundation Collection. It has been six decades since we began carefully to add to what began as Ishibashi Shojiro’s personal collection. We now offer our visitors the opportunity to savor the results in depth.”

The eleven “thematic categories” in this exhibition are The Self-Portrait, The Portrait, The Nude, Models, Leisure, The Narrative, Mountains, Rivers, The Sea, The Still Life, and Contemporary Art. Each theme highlights the beauty of Western art and Japanese art. The diversity of the artists on show means that the senses and fusions of ideas challenge you in each section and clearly you have many common denominators, notably the lore of France for many Japanese artists.

In the first theme titled The Self-Portrait the most striking image is Paul Cezanne because the color scheme, powerful eyes, and the rich background highlights many aspects of his art. The sternest image applies to Sakamoto Hanjiro because he looks “cold” and emanating strength. In the other direction the world of Pablo Picasso highlights the world he portrayed therefore no noticeable features can be seen. Unlike the portrayal of Sakamoto Hanjiro the image of Rembrandt van Rijin highlights innocence and a person who appears open.

The next theme takes you to The Portrait and the art works selected and the portraits highlighted apply to various themes. Pierre-Auguste Renoir in the Young Girl and Mlle Georgette Charpentier Seated highlights the innocence of young girls who have the world in front of them. Leonard Foujita (Fujita Tsuguharu) in contrast focuses on an elegant and sophisticated lady who looks extremely appealing. The most illuminating image is titled the Boy by Sekine Shoji because the facial expression and usage of red leaves a deep impression.

The Nude is the third theme and the two most distinctive images are After the Bath by Edgar Degas andWoman Reclining by Kuniyoshi Yasuo. Edgar Degas is clearly taking extreme care because the detail is very sophisticated. While Kuniyoshi Yasuo shows a lady entering another world with her eyes closed and the contours of her body expressing natural beauty. Alternatively, Henri Matisse painting called Nude in the Studiotypifies his distinctive style and much is left to the imagination. The most realistic pieces of art which are clear in this section apply to Wada Eisaku and Okada Saburosuke.

Following this theme is Models which flows naturally from The Nude section. This collection highlights six various pieces of art. The style of Henri Matisse means that his Woman with Blue Bodice is the most distinctive because the other pieces of art focus on mainstream images. The one image which is striking for its diversity and richness is the Girl of Brehat by Kuroda Seiki. For you have many fascinating angles which highlights the innocence of a young lady who isn’t broken by poverty and her surroundings. It could feasibly highlight nervousness to some individuals but personally this image focuses on strength despite adversity. Both pieces of art by Fujishima Takeji are classics because Black Fan and Woman of Ciociaria show two women who are very alluring because of their elegant features. Young Woman in the Woods by Camille Corot is also very beautiful but within a more simplistic message than the two paintings by Fujishima Takeji.

Leisure is the next theme and all seven pieces of art are extremely different. In a sense, this section is the most diverse because of the various styles of the artists. Therefore, it is difficult to pinpoint the most striking images because much will depend on the personal attraction of the viewer. Of course, this will apply to each piece of art but in this theme it isn’t easy to highlight what stands out because each image is extremely distinctive by itself. In saying that, the work titled In the Wings at the Circus by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec is extremely fascinating because of the color scheme and layout. The darkness of In the Lamplight by Pierre Bonnard leaves much to the imagination but when you look very close up it is clear that the atmosphere is extremely relaxing. Overall, this theme is the most diverse because you have the natural leisure time by the sea painted by Eugene Boudin, to the non-facial and foggy contours of Masked Ball at the Opera by Edouard Manet, and this is followed by the striking colors of Saltimbanque Seated with Arms Crossed by Pablo Picasso.

The Narrative is the next theme and Christ in the Outskirts by Georges Rouault is extremely powerful by its simplicity and meaning. Also, for many artists they were “in the outskirts” because of thinking, poverty, and being unrecognized compared with the talents they had. Honore Daumier on the other hand is depicting a picture of strength and the color scheme to Don Quixote in the Mountains is extremely beautiful. The art work titled Onamuchi-no-mikoto by Aoki Shigeru is one of his finest pieces of work that he ever produced. This applies to the potency of the image and the mysterious angle regarding the lady holding her breast and looking directly at the viewer who studies this art piece. On top of this you have the majesty of A Biblical or Historical Nocturnal Scene by Rembrandt van Rijin.

Following on from The Narrative is the Mountains theme. This fascinating section highlights a traditional Japanese artist called Sesshu Toyo. He, like Rembrandt van Rijin, belongs to a different world than the majority of artists on show because both these artists belong to a completely different period of history. The Landscape of the Four Seasons by Sesshu Toyo is a reminder of the rich connection between China and Japan and how both cultures have impacted on each other. Mount Sainte-Victoire and Chateau Noir by Paul Cezanne is a completely different style than Sesshu Toyo but the majesty of nature and architecture bridges time, culture, style, and perspectives. Similarly, you can see a rich connection between Meadowland by Henri Rousseau andPower Plant in the Snow by Oka Shikanosuke. This doesn’t apply to the themes selected by both artists but it certainly applies to the style of art and clearly Oka Shikanosuke admired Henri Rousseau. The art pieces by Paul Gauguin, Gustave Courbet, Camille Corot, and Sakamoto Hanjiro, are all extremely beautiful based on different factors. Indeed, Ville d’Avray by Camille Corot could be a scene from any nation with a similar countryside landscape. Therefore, this stunning piece of art is timeless and international within nations that share a similar backdrop within the countryside.

Moving on to the next theme titled Rivers.  The stunning June Morning in Saint-Mammes by Alfred Sisley is a true delight along with Women Going to the Woods by the same artist. Alfred Sisley produced countless numbers of amazing landscapes and the nature of Vegetable Garden by Camille Pissarro which is highlighted in this collection would have appealed greatly to him. Flood at Argenteuvil, Water Lily Pond, and Water Liliesby Claude Monet highlights the majesty of this amazing artist who is deeply admired in Japan. The art pieces by Vincent van Gogh titled Windmills on Montmartre, Washing Place in Grez-sur-Loing by Asai Chu, and the delightful Landscape near Vernon by Pierre Bonnard, are real treats which show the power of the Rivers theme. Indeed, every piece of art in this collection is richly rewarding and while it isn’t clear why Café Terrace with Posters by Saeki Yuzo is in the Rivers theme, this doesn’t distract from the power of this piece of art which was created by an individual who died extremely young and in tragic circumstances. Another quality piece of art applies to Canal Boat by Maurice de Vlaminck which is so rich when it comes to the color scheme and with an industrial landscape in the background fitting in gently because of the amazing style of this artist.

The richness of this amazing exhibition is further highlighted by the next theme titled The SeaOnce more Claude Monet comes to prominence because the Belle-Ile, Rain Effect highlights the rugged beauty of nature.Collioure by Henri Matisse once more shows the powerful individuality of this artist and the style fits in well withPort of Concarneau by Paul Signac. Fujishima Takeji comes to prominence in this collection because four pieces of his art are displayed. Each piece highlights the richness of Fujishima Takeji but Waves at Oaraistands out because it is a real gem. In contrast to this is the delightful Distant View of Awajishima which is tranquil compared with the Waves at Oarai. Similarly to the power of the above mentioned artist is the stunningSeascape, Mera by Aoki Shigeru.

Following on from this theme is The Still Life collection whereby Roses and Lemons and a Melon by Yasui Sotaro are extremely beautiful. The theme of both isn’t complex but the style and power of color is a wonder to behold and highlights the strength of Yasui Sotaro. Innocent Moonlit Night by Koga Harue is intriguing because of the chaotic nature of things in the layout but the layout itself is based on order in a surreal sense. This collection is also blessed with Peaches by Pierre Bonnard, Bowl and Milk-jug by Paul Cezanne, Interior, House in Dordogne by Leonard Foujita, and Still Life with Horse’s Head by Paul Gauguin.

The final theme in this entire exhibition is titled Contemporary Art. In this collection the piece of art by Zao Wou-ki takes prominence because of the richness of the background. Other notable pieces of art includeComposition by Serge Poliakoff and Red Devil by Sugai Kumi.

Overall, the exhibition by the Bridgestone Museum of Art is a real treasure because the art on show is full of richness, diversity, and imagination. The artists speak for themselves because you have so many amazing artists which are highlighted in this adorable exhibition. Therefore, irrespective if you are a Tokyoite or tourist, the Bridgestone Museum of Art should come highly on your agenda because the richness of culture highlighted at this institution is truly remarkable.

http://www.bridgestone-museum.gr.jp/en/ in English

http://www.bridgestone-museum.gr.jp/  in Japanese

The images in this article do not come from the Bridgestone Museum of Art. In order to view the real works by all the artists highlighted then please visit the above websites.

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

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June 3, 2012

Tokyo lifestyle: Canal Café in Iidabashi, Chinzan-so garden and fashion in Ikebukuro

Tokyo lifestyle: Canal Café in Iidabashi, Chinzan-so garden and fashion in Ikebukuro

Sarah Deschamps and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

Tokyo is a very intriguing city which caters for so many different lifestyles. Also, within such a short space of time you can visit a wealth of diversity. This article provides a glimpse into the richness of Tokyo life by focusing on areas which appeal to people of all ages.

Within 9 minutes on the Yurakucho subway line you can visit the mega fashion district of Ikebukuro, the adorable Chinzan-so garden and relax at the Canal Café in Iidabashi. All three places can be visited by the Yurakucho train line and in total it only takes between 9 to 10 minutes in travel time. This amazing area provides amazing relaxation, the crème de la crème of fashion boutiques, the stunning garden of Chinzan-so, delightful Canal Café whereby individuals can enjoy gentle rowing, and so much more.

The Canal Café in Iidabashi is a great place to relax and enjoy the view provided by this elegant café. When the weather permits you will see people enjoying rowing, sitting outside, enjoying the lovely environment, watching the distant trains go by, and soaking up the delightful atmosphere

Also, individuals can enjoy Italian cuisine, Thai curry, and a host of other dishes. The Canal Café provides ample choice and this applies to dining inside, eating certain dishes outside via the spacious seating which is available, relaxing with a quiet drink, and for more daring individuals, then relaxing by rowing. Indeed, the choice angle and spacious sitting areas within the Canal Café, is most appealing and for this reason many Tokyoites enjoy the ambient atmosphere time after time.

The La Cucina restaurant provides delicious Italian food. Therefore, people can decide on a scrumptious meal or a more casual time. Either way, the relaxing nature of the Canal Café, the rowing angle, scenic background, and the spacious layout; means that it is a place which is well worth visiting.

For lovers of fashion then Ikebukuro is an amazing place to visit because this trendy district is going from strength to strength.  The east-side is extremely busy but the fashion angle on the west-side is developing nicely and you have a different feel to both sides of Ikebukuro. Also, the huge train complex is an enormous hub for fashion. Therefore, you will find amazing department stores which include Lumine, Tobu Department Store, Seibu Department Store, Esola, Marui, Parco, and so many other fantastic places to visit, either within the train complex, connected by underground passages (Marui) or within a one minute walk (Parco on the east side).

Of course, Tobu Department Store and Seibu Department Store cater for a wide variety of shopping and both stores focus heavily on their respective Ikebukuro base. The age range may vary at each department store but collectively individuals of all ages are served in Ikebukuro and this applies to stylish companies which provide real quality. This fact means that the fashion scene in this thriving district is blessed with top notch Japanese and international fashion companies, which caters for a vast spectrum of styles.

In Esola you have lovely boutiques which include Actuel, Amphi, Barbie Store, Beardsley Gallardagalante, Blue Bell Market, DouDou, Elleva, FRAMeWORK, Free’s Mart, Jolly Boutique, Muriel & Mercuria, Nuit et Jour Spick and Span, Opaque Clip, Royal Flash, and Turno Jeana. Esola is on the west side and is near to Lumine, Tobu Department Store, within easy reach to the trendy Ikebukuro Fukutoshin area, and within minutes from Marui. Also, you have a delightful art and crafts center in the same vicinity which is a must place to visit for Tokyoites and tourists alike.

Within the same Yurakucho subway line catchment area you have Edogawabashi where Chinzan-so is located. Of course, Ikebukuro is served by many train lines and is the second busiest train station in Tokyo. However, the Yurakucho subway line hub which applies to this article opens up all three areas which are connected by this underground train line.

Chinzan-so is one of the most adorable places to visit in the whole of Tokyo because the garden is extremely rich in history. The landscape and architecture highlights the refinement of Japan within such a compact area. Also, you have many restaurants within Chinzan-so in order to eat scrumptious food and the Japanese angle means that each place matches the scenic surrounding.

On top of this, you have an amazing hotel called the Four Seasons Hotel which is internationally famous(http://www.fourseasons.com/tokyo/) because of the sublime luxury that this company provides. The Chinzan-so based Four Seasons Hotel is located in such an amazing part of Tokyo, that a stay at this luxury hotel must rank high on the list of all individuals who adore quality in all directions. This applies to the stunning garden of Chinzan-so, the exquisite architecture, scrumptious food, richness of culture, and the majestic luxury of Four Seasons Hotel.

Turning back to the stunning beauty of Chinzan-so then in a previous article by Modern Tokyo Times it was stated that “Chinzan-so is a stunning garden in Tokyo whereby you can view the natural beauty of an amazing Japanese garden, beautiful architecture, elements of Buddhism, the magical world of Shintoism, and so much more. Also, unlike the vast majority of stunning gardens in Tokyo which close early this doesn’t apply to Chinzan-so therefore at night the garden is also extremely beautiful and you have many restaurants to eat scrumptious Japanese food. However, being Chinzan-so, then even the restaurants blend in with the natural environment and clearly this beautiful place would bless any major city in the world.”

Indeed, in Chinzan-so you also have a rich Taoist element. Therefore, the fusion of this philosophy, along with Buddhism and Shintoism, highlights the richness of this amazing garden. You also have a sacred 500 year old tree, a delightful waterfall, small Shinto shrine, Taoist images, lovely Pagoda, and so much more. This means that you can’t help but fall in love with Chinzan-so and the views at night are also extremely romantic because the garden is elegantly lit up.

Overall, the three places highlighted in this article show the richness of the lifestyle of Tokyo. After all, throughout this amazing city you will have countless catchment areas which are in easy distance because of the fantastic infrastructure of this high tech mega-city.

 

Chinzan-so and Four Seasons Hotel

http://www.chinzanso.com/english/

http://www.fourseasons.com/tokyo/   Four Seasons Hotel

http://www.chinzanso.com/english/restaurant.html

Canal Café

www.canalcafe.jp 

Fashion

http://www.esola-ikebukuro.com/

http://orizzonti.co.jp/category/actuel/

http://www.barbie-stores.com/

http://www.bluebellmarket.net/index.html

http://www.palgroup.co.jp/brands/doudou/

http://www.turnojeana.jp/

http://www.frees-mart.com/index.html

http://m-muriel.jp/index.html

http://www.elleva.jp/

http://www.frame-works.co.jp/index_n.html

http://blog-s.frame-works.co.jp/  Spick and Span official blog  

http://www.jolly-boutique.com/

http://www.world.co.jp/opaqueclip/

http://royalflash-jp.com/pc/home.html

Other Shops

http://www.loccitane.co.jp/shop/

http://www.unico-fan.co.jp/

http://www.aveda.co.jp/default.asp

http://www.laureloil.jp/

http://www.nonbrush.com/

http://gloccy.jp/

http://www.lunch8.com/

http://www.toffy.jp/

http://ameblo.jp/4ft-ikebukuro/

 

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

June 3, 2012

Japanese art and culture: Yoshu Chikanobu provides a rich glimpse into Japan

Japanese art and culture: Yoshu Chikanobu provides a rich glimpse into Japan

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

Yoshu Chikanobu (Toyohara Chikanobu) lived between 1838 and 1912 and much of his art highlights the changing nature of Japan. The opening up of Japan after the Meiji Restoration provided many new dreams for Japanese citizens but it also was the start of the death knell for many artisans. This applies to the technological changes taking place and the changing values and thinking during this period of history.

Chikanobu, like other ukiyo-e artists in the Meiji era, understood the need to adapt because many new art forms were altering the artistic landscape in Japan. Western art especially impacted on the new generation of artists and political elites wanted to encourage modernism. Therefore, the new crème de la crème of young artists mainly adopted concepts outside of the powerful ukiyo-e art form which was so potent during the Edo period.

At the same time, technological advancements and photography were impacting greatly on ukiyo-e from a virtually negative point of view. The old ways which nurtured art in the Edo period, along with other forms of art, were being challenged by many new art movements. Also, photography would eat away at the need for ukiyo-e because it could not compete on a technological level playing field.

Chikanobu highlights an array of subjects in his art and this applies to the power of the past to the changing nature of Japanese society. He also depicted powerful historical figures in Japanese history to highlighting the nationalist side of the Meiji period which applies to war. Also, when you view Chikanobu’s art you can visually witness the imperial aspects of Western powers, which were being replicated in dress styles when it applied to elites.

Cultural wise, Chikanobu also painted many adorable themes. This applies to the Japanese tea ceremony, ikebana, kabuki, fashion in the changing Japan, and a plethora of other subjects. In this sense, Chikanobu opens up many aspects of Japan related to many themes. These themes also apply to the “old world” and “new world.”

The Toshidama Gallery (http://toshidama.wordpress.comcomments that “Chikanobu is one of the giants of the Meiji era of Japanese Woodblock prints. With Kunichika and Yoshitoshi, Chikanobu distinguished the turmoil of Japanese culture as it came to terms with the new age. Like them his life and career were inextricably linked to the upheavals in Japanese history and the near civil wars that characterized the time.”

Chikanobu and the series titled A Mirror of the Ages is also a classic because of the rich cultural themes related to women and fashion throughout the changing times. The Toshidama Gallery highlights this series strongly by stating that “This whole series is one of the outstanding achievements of late nineteenth century Japanese art. One of his best series, A Mirror of the Ages showed women by fashion and hair style throughout history. There is of course the longing for the past and yet these prints are unmistakably modern and of their time….The quality of printing is outstanding, especially in Chikanobu’s use of white for the rendering of the powdered faces. It is often forgotten by art historians that this was the period about all others when the technique of woodblock printing achieved its zenith whilst at the same time there were artists of stature to execute it.”

Other adorable print series include “Chiyoda no Ooku” (Court Ladies of the Chiyoda Palace) and “Shin Bijin” (True Beauties). Of course, Chikanobu produced many amazing pieces of art but both the above named series relate to genuine aspects of female beauty in Japan. This is highlighted by traditional clothes, for example the kimono, to the changing nature of the time which applies to Western dress styles.

In a past article about Chikanobu I comment that “Chikanobu not only witnessed the new revolutionary period and how elites looked to the West but by the late 1880s and early 1890s nostalgia also returned.  Obviously for the masses they were outside both themes and the only important thing was survival and adapting.”

The art of Chikanobu stands out dramatically and this not only applies to the exquisite skills that he was blessed with, but also to the themes that Chikanobu highlights. He certainly provides many glimpses into Japan which relate to the “old world,” cultural aspects of Japan, and the modernization of the Meiji period.

Overall, Chikanobu is one of the greats of the ukiyo-e art movement and given the plethora of fantastic ukiyo-e artists, this highlights his richness to the full. Therefore, if you adore Japanese art, culture, and history, then Chikanobu will appeal greatly because of the broad themes he depicted in his art.

 

http://www.toshidama-japanese-prints.com/item_216/Chikanobu-A-Mirror-of-the-Ages.htm

Please visit http://toshidama.wordpress.com for more articles and information.

Please visit http://toshidama-japanese-prints.com/ –   On our site you will see a wonderful selection of Japanese woodblock prints for sale. Ukiyo-e (the Japanese name for woodblock prints of the 18th and 19thcenturies) are beautiful, collectible and a sound financial investment

http://www.depauw.edu/news/index.asp?id=20942

http://moderntokyotimes.com

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

June 3, 2012

Tokyo lifestyle in Ueno: culture, fashion, and natural vibes

Tokyo lifestyle in Ueno: culture, fashion, and natural vibes

Sarah Deschamps, Michel Lebon and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

The Ueno district in Tokyo is extremely diverse because aspects of “Old Tokyo” still survive alongside modernity within this vibrant part of Tokyo. Ueno provides many cultural places to visit. Therefore, Tokyoites and tourists flock to this area because of the many attractions provided. However, within Ueno you get a real mish-mash which flows from cultural attractions to social deprivation; from fashion to the sex trade which is powerful; and other contradictory factors in this famous entertainment district.

Tokyo lifestyle in Ueno and the surrounding area provides a plethora of different angles but unlike most major parts of Tokyo, it is a district which is either loved strongly or disliked. It normally isn’t a district where people sit in the middle because of the very nature of the area. This applies to Tokyoites who are going to pick a new place to reside or to enjoy the natural vibes of this district.

However, from a tourist point of view then Ueno is a must place to visit because you have so many cultural attractions and places to enjoy. Also, the natural raw energy of Ueno can be felt because this part of Tokyo is very distinctive when compared with other major districts. Therefore, tourists can enjoy the usual cultural spots to visit and at night the entertainment aspect of Ueno is extremely vibrant.

Ueno is also a gateway for people who reside in Chiba prefecture and Ibaraki prefecture. In saying this, Ueno is still firmly entrenched within Tokyo because within a short distance by train you have thriving districts like Ikebukuro and Akihabara. In between you have sleepy but beautiful areas like Komagome which is blessed with stunning gardens. Also, Nippori is extremely fascinating because if you visit the old area, then you have many stunning temples to visit – and providing your knowledge of the area is really good, then individuals can walk from old Nippori to Ueno.

The most notable cultural attractions apply to the Tokyo National Museum, National Museum of Western Art, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo Bunka Kaikan, National Museum of Eastern Art, Tokugawa Mausoleum, Shitamachi Museum, Sogakudo Concert Hall, University Art Museum (Tokyo University of the Arts), Tosho-gu-Shrine, Iwasaki Family House, Yushima Tenjin, the statue of Saigo Takamori, Ueno Park, Shinobazu Pond, and other attractions like Ueno Zoo. Therefore, from this extensive list, which could easily be added, it is clear that Tokyoites and tourists alike have much to enjoy in Ueno because the cultural factor is very important.

The diversity of Ueno can also be felt within the fashion angle because it is a real mixture of natural street fashion, top notch department stores, independent fashion, and other styles. Ueno isn’t like Aoyama, Ginza, Harajuku, Ikebukuro, Shibuya, Shinjuku, and Omotesando when it comes to fashion; but this doesn’t take away from the buzzing fashion angle of Ueno. This means that the multi-dimensional factor behind Ueno is catering for different fashion vibes alongside the choice of major stores.

In Marui department store you will find many amazing boutiques and stores to visit. Marui is one of the most highly respected department stores for fashion lovers which can be found throughout Tokyo, and in other parts of Japan like Osaka. Marui focuses on lovely boutiques for ladies and caters for male fashion. At all times this company understands the trends of Japan and for this reason it’s pulling power remains strong year after year.

Stores that can be found in Marui in Ueno applies to Sly, Moussy, Vence, Peyton Place, Rew de Rew, Mercury Duo, Jill Stuart, Swingle, Samantha Thavasa, Xmiss, Gap, Muji, Tsumori Chisato, Anna Sui, Earth Music & Ecology, Laisse Passe, Will Selection, Mary Quant, and too many others to mention. The choice on offer by Marui sums up this company very well because you have so many elegant boutiques to visit and other companies in this adorable store. Therefore, Marui in Ueno is a magnet for fashion and the same applies to all Marui stores which enhance the lifestyle of so many Tokyoites.

Matsuzakaya is the most famous major shopping landmark in Ueno because this company was established in this part of Tokyo a very long time ago. Indeed, the company itself can trace itself back to the early seventeenth century. Matsuzakaya sells a vast array of products and given its rich history then individuals should pay a visit. Also, you can buy scrumptious food and enjoy the dining provided within this department store.

Ueno vibes can be felt in places like the Ameyoko bazaar (Ameya-yokocho bazaar) and Takeya where both places provide their own unique angle. Indeed, the Ameyoko bazaar stands out in Tokyo because you have a rare buzzing market to visit which caters for different goods. Likewise, Takeya caters for an array of products and the independent vibe is most welcoming. Therefore, both places are well worth a visit for bargains and to feel a different atmosphere which is rare for Tokyo.

Overall, Ueno is certainly very individualistic and the options available are enormous. This fact means that Tokyoites and tourists continue to flock to this part of Tokyo. Not surprisingly, the cultural angle is a huge pulling power. However, within Ueno you also have an interesting fashion scene and clearly it is a bustling place to reside. In saying that, the beauty of Ueno is that you also have many Buddhist temples, Shinto shrines, and cultural places to visit. This means that Ueno caters for a broad array of individuals.

http://www.tokyoessentials.com/ueno.html  (about Ueno)

http://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/location/regional/tokyo/ueno.html   (info about Ueno)

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

June 2, 2012

Tokyo fashion and the amazing Style Arena website

Tokyo fashion and the amazing Style Arena website

Michel Lebon and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

The website called Style Arena (http://www.style-arena.jp) is awash with the latest fashion styles which are impacting on the fashion scene of Tokyo. Internationally, Tokyo is one of the most vibrant fashion scenes on this planet because of the fantastic diversity of the fashion scene in this high octane mega city. Therefore, individuals from all over the world are fascinated by the latest vibes hitting the streets of this fabulous metropolis.

Of course you will have many high quality websites highlighting Tokyo fashion. However, it is difficult to surpass Style Arena when it applies to the collective coverage of different fashion districts. Also, Style Arena isn’t focused on any particular boutiques like some other websites nor is this website limited to an over emphasis on one particular angle or special district in Tokyo. Instead, Style Arena updates the “real vibes” hitting Tokyo and gives ample information about the individuals who are highlighted. For this reason, this buzzing website stands out because of the angles which are highlighted and the lovely quality which is portrayed by their in-house images.

The Style Arena website is maintained professionally by the Japan Fashion Association all year round. Therefore, you will see regular updates of new images and important information related to the vibes of Tokyo. Another major theme of this adorable website is the international feel. This applies to the interactive nature of Style Arena which can be viewed in Japanese, Chinese, English, and the Korean language.

This angle highlights the amazing professionalism of this adorable website and that the Japan Fashion Association is fully aware about the power of Tokyo fashion. In this sense, Style Arena can’t be matched when it comes to this fantastic feature. The same also applies to the images of street fashion which isn’t tainted by bias unlike some other websites, which are too predictable after viewing time after time. Therefore, Style Arena is based on freshness and relating to the needs and requirements of the viewer.

On the current main page of Style Arena the vibes of Harajuku, Omotesando, Ginza, Daikanyama, and Shibuya, are highlighted. Thereby, people can not only view the stunning images on show but they can also read about important fashion factors. This notably applies to the respective favorite boutiques of individuals and where they bought their current clothes from.

Other (http://www.style-arena.jp/feature/special/ginza_rw_201203/) lovely features apply to the “Special” area and “Event Snap.” These two important features highlight the latest events in Tokyo and show the fashionable runways which express the stunning nature of Tokyo fashion. Like usual, the images match this area to perfection because the photos are elegantly done.

Throughout the year you will have articles and information about other amazing fashion districts in Tokyo. This entails focusing on Ebisu, Shinjuku, Shimokitazawa, Ikebukuro, Koenji, Nakameguro, Jiyugaoka, Yurakucho, and all fashionable districts of dynamic Tokyo. Alongside this you will have articles which highlight “New Tribes” and “Shops” of interest.

In a past article about Style Arena by Modern Tokyo Times it was stated that “Style Arena began in 2002 and in June this year this stunning fashion website will mark ten years. In all that time people have witnessed a website which highlights the Tokyo fashion scene with complete professionalism and care. This is clearly apparent by the layout, the user-friendly nature of the website, striking images of fashionable individuals in Tokyo, and updated information highlighting fashion companies, new trends, and other important areas.”

At Modern Tokyo Times we have no qualms about highlighting Style Arena and stating openly that this amazing fashion website can’t be surpassed, when it comes to “the real fashion angle” of this amazing city. This applies to the interactive nature of Style Arena related to language, images, information, user-friendly layout, unbiased focus on the Tokyo fashion scene, and other important areas.

It is also important to stress that for boutiques which are focused on the fashion scene in Tokyo – a wealth of essential information is being provided by Style Arena. After all, information about favorite boutiques and so forth is provided under the main image highlighted. This fantastic feature can be utilized by fashion lovers and the fashion sector alike.

If you adore Tokyo fashion and want to view the diverse nature of street fashion and the latest vibes hitting Tokyo. Then without a shadow of a doubt Style Arena is a must for all individuals who cherish the fashion scene of Tokyo. Style Arena is simply a cut above the rest when it applies to the collective fashion angle of buzzing Tokyo.

 

http://www.style-arena.jp

http://www.style-arena.jp/street/individual/dt/4917

http://www.style-arena.jp/feature/special/ginza_rw_201203/

Images in this article are not from Style Arena.  Please click on the Style Arena website to view the latest trends of Tokyo.

The images in this article belong to Modern Tokyo Times but please feel free to use our images. If you mention Modern Tokyo Times it would be appreciated but all images are for our supporters and belong to everyone because of our interactive nature.

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com