Another Japanese Prime Minister to fall by the wayside

Another Japanese Prime Minister to fall by the wayside

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

If you don’t know the current leader of Japan then please don’t worry because like usual he isn’t going to last long.  This is the reality of Japan because when politicians reach the top of the slide they soon fall down and are replaced.  Therefore, what is the point of Japan having a leading figure when they soon resign or are forced from office?

It may be the case that Prime Minister Naoto Kan is not the greatest of all leaders but does this really matter?  I mean, the former leader of America, Bill Clinton, was touching something that should have been out of reach given the responsibility of his job but playing around with words got him off the hook. 

Yet in Japan people leave office at the drop of a hat and how is this helping the land of the rising sun?  Even worse, the death toll from March 11 is enormous and you still have many bodies that haven’t been found.  Also, you have an ongoing global financial crisis which threatens to blow another ill wind and stability would make a change in the political arena of Japan given the last five to six years.

It does seem that Kan will stand down by late August or early September at the latest.  Will this help the Democratic Party of Japan and indeed will this help the land of the rising sun? 

Probably not, but does anyone care in the political arena of Japan?  Again, probably not when applied to the whole of politicians but surely some politicians understand that this is making Japan look shallow and rather immature.

Kan stated that “My Cabinet has done what it had to do and I have no regrets.” If so, then why leave office?  The reason is obvious because not only did the opposition put pressure on Kan but also important political leaders from within Kan’s ruling party put the knife in deeper. 

It is difficult to keep up with all the political leaders because they come and go without achieving much and the farce just continues from one political leader to the next.

Politics in Japan is about low mileage for the main political leader and to brush under the carpet real issues.  Therefore, while Kan may not be the best postwar leader in the history of Japan this shouldn’t matter?

Japan needs to adopt political reforms which enable political leaders to stay in office and implement reforms or to at least stamp their thinking.  The current system is not working and Japanese leaders can’t be taken seriously because of the current political debacle where they come and go all too quickly.

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: